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Anything That Moves Me

Words as Rough Sex

I recently watched an old television play, "I Remember Nelson," about the naval hero of the Napoleonic era. The story moved me so much I gave it five stars on Netflix, and was shocked to see how many viewers had given it only one or two. "Boooooring," was the common verdict; too talky.  Read More 
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Please Remember to Tip the Author

Recently, a friend who is persistent to the point of being called "dogged" achieved a long-term goal: she found a publisher for an anthology called "Best Bi Short Stories." This anthology has been in publishing limbo for so long that my contribution, the first chapter from Pride/Prejudice (released in January of 2010), was a work-in-progress when I submitted it.  Read More 
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Choosing to be Queer

Actress Cynthia Nixon has been generating a lot of discussion with her interview(s) in which she said being "gay" is, for her, a "choice." Lady Gaga, of course, went all-out for the opposite point of view in her "Born This Way." Most of the arguments over this concept aren't very edifying, as biographer Sir Charles James Napier said of the Duke of Wellington's sex life.  Read More 
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The "Hot Hunk of Bisexual Manhood" Problem

Well, it's not exactly a problem...

But when I was writing the introduction to my Eclipsis series of "Lady Amalie's memoirs," I used the phrase to describe my version of Fitzwilliam Darcy, making a comparison with the HHoBM who is the hero of these new stories. Perhaps not surprisingly, the friend who was encouraging me to edit and publish these books advised me to change it. Sets the wrong tone, she felt.  Read More 
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Bisexual Heroes

I uploaded my fifth Eclipsis story today: Captivity. This is the first work of mine that isn't, in some way, a romance. It is, as best I can describe it, a family drama. But what a family!

If what I've written so far is alternative or unconventional romance, this is definitely alternative,  Read More 
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Oxfordian Snobbery

Many years ago I came across one of the books espousing the "Oxfordian theory," the belief that Edward de Vere, the 17th Earl of Oxford, wrote the works attributed to Shakespeare.
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Double Indemnity

In all the "discussions" about the cost of healthcare and President Obama's castrated legislation, one question that is rarely asked is: why do we use "insurance" to pay for what is, or should be, on ongoing, regular household expense?

For those of you wondering who is this phantom blogger who has taken over Ann Herendeen's web site, and what happened to the real Ann Herendeen who writes about her bisexual m/m/f ménage fiction,  Read More 
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Crying Over Filet Mignon

I live alone, making spaghetti with sauce from a jar tests the limits of my culinary abilities, and I love red meat. So one Thanksgiving I invited just one very good friend over and I served filet mignon.

When I put that first big bite of charred-on-the-outside, oozing-blood-on-the-inside tender beef into my mouth, I almost cried. It was that good.  Read More 
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Beautiful Metaphors, Ugly Memoirs

Colm Toibin, in a review of a biography of E.M. Forster, derided the idea of the "honest novel" (as the biographer, Wendy Moffat, described Forster's Maurice): "novels should not be honest. They are a pack of lies that are also a set of metaphors … they are not forms of self-expression, or true confession."  Read More 
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What's It All About, Amalie?

I just spent a long weekend copy editing the second book in my ECLIPSIS series of Lady Amalie's memoirs, Choices. If anything could cure a person of wanting to be a writer, this would seem to be it.

But it occurred to me that the worst is yet to come: the synopsis.  Read More 
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